The APBC call for more education in safety around dogs for children

Date Released: 
27/03/2013

The Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors (APBC) has called for more education regarding safety around dogs for children, after the recent tragic events leading to the loss of a 14 year old girl’s life in Greater Manchester.

 
The APBC believe that the education of parents and children on keeping safe around dogs is of paramount importance.  An approved safety resource page for teachers, children and parents is available on the APBC website, highlighting the best sites to visit when owners wish to seek advice about safety around dogs:  http://www.apbc.org.uk/info/dog_safety_information
 
The APBC would also like to see a more structured approach in teaching children in primary and secondary schools about dog safety.  Rosie Barclay, APBC Chair, has been instrumental in this on Jersey, as she explains “we teach the children to recognise the more subtle body language that might indicate that the dog is under some degree of stress, or feels threatened, such as looking away, lip licking and half-moon eyes”.  For older children Rosie suggests that teachers and their pupils would benefit from the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour (ASAB) resource “Keeping Ourselves Safe near Dogs”.  Written by veterinary behaviourist, Kendal Shepherd MRCVS, this publication can also be found on the APBC approved links page, along with teacher’s notes and worksheets.  Rosie states “let’s educate ourselves and our children in dog behaviour and how to stay safe and help reduce such tragic events in the future.”
 
 
ENDS
 
Release Date: 27th March 2013
 
For further details:
 
Rosie Barclay APBC  Chair  rosiebarclay [at] uk2 [dot] net
 
 
 
 
 
 
NOTES FOR EDITORS
The APBC, founded in 1989, is the leading organisation in the field of companion animal behaviour and many of its members are at the cutting edge of the latest research into this rapidly growing discipline. The APBC organises a number of seminars and events throughout the year for both the veterinary and behaviour professions. Further information can be found at www.apbc.org.uk.  Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors, PO BOX 46, Worcester, WR8 9YS, UK